Malaysia’s First Film to Debut in the U.S. Is a ‘True’ Horror Movie

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Brando Lee’s Don’t Look at the Demon is the first Malaysian film to open in the United States, debuting on 250 screens across North America on Oct. 6.

Brando Lee’s Don’t Look at the Demon has made history as the first Malaysian film to release in the United States.

According to the Malaysian outlet SAYSDon’t Look at the Demon will release worldwide on Oct. 6. “With the global release of Don’t Look at the Demon, I hope to inspire local producers to reach for the stars and keep pushing forward to represent Malaysia on an international scale,” Lee said during the film’s premiere at Dadi Cinemas in Pavilion KL. “The release of this film is not just my success, but it is the success of all of us in Malaysia,” Lee continued. “I am extremely proud to set the benchmark and bring pride to our country. This film will forever be an emblem to remind Malaysia that no goal is too big if you set your minds to it.”

Don’t Look at the Demon follows a group of American paranormal investigators and a spiritual medium as they look into supernatural occurrences at a house that was built on Fraser’s Hill, a mountain village in Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia, in the early 1970s. Traditional Asian folklore is reportedly at the center of the film, a subject tackled from the perspective of its American characters. The film stars Fiona Dourif (Tenet), Harris Dickinson (The King’s Man), Malin Crépin, Jordan Belfi, Randy Wayne and William Miller.

In addition to the U.S., Don’t Look at the Demon will screen in 20 countries, including Cambodia, Canada, Mongolia, the Philippines, Poland, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam and the UK. The film, which premiered in Malaysian cinemas on Sept. 29, will play on 250 screens in North America alone.

Among those who have already praised Don’t Look at the Demon are Datuk Zahidi Zainul Abidin, Malaysia’s Deputy Minister of Communications and Multimedia. “The film provides an opportunity for people from other countries to learn and understand the cultures, traditions, and tourist attractions in Malaysia, which in turn may contribute to the improvement of the tourism sector,” Zahidi said at the film’s premiere. During the event, Zahidi also expressed his hopes for the future of Malaysian cinema. “Now that we have entered the American market, we can strive for reaching new heights by aiming to obtain awards such as the Oscars, Emmy, and so forth, in the near future,” he said.

In addition to the U.S., Don’t Look at the Demon will screen in 20 countries, including Cambodia, Canada, Mongolia, the Philippines, Poland, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam and the UK. The film, which premiered in Malaysian cinemas on Sept. 29, will play on 250 screens in North America alone.

Among those who have already praised Don’t Look at the Demon are Datuk Zahidi Zainul Abidin, Malaysia’s Deputy Minister of Communications and Multimedia. “The film provides an opportunity for people from other countries to learn and understand the cultures, traditions, and tourist attractions in Malaysia, which in turn may contribute to the improvement of the tourism sector,” Zahidi said at the film’s premiere. During the event, Zahidi also expressed his hopes for the future of Malaysian cinema. “Now that we have entered the American market, we can strive for reaching new heights by aiming to obtain awards such as the Oscars, Emmy, and so forth, in the near future,” he said.

Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite made history in 2020 when it became the first non-English-language film to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards. Since then, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), the organization behind the Oscars, has adopted new representation and inclusion standards for awards eligibility. These new guidelines, in addition to the Academy’s growing membership of those from diverse backgrounds, are meant to ensure that film’s like Don’t Look at the Demon receive more consideration in the future.

Source: CBR